The Duck of Minerva

The Duck Quacks at Twilight

Friday Nerd Blogging: Jumping the Shark

June 12, 2015

A friend of mine mis-typed Sharknado and found this:

sharknato

And, of course, as someone who co-authored a book on NATO, I could not help but consider the picture and then over-analyze.  Specifically, the Dave and Steve book considers, among other things, the caveats or restrictions that countries placed on their contingents in Afghanistan and missions near/over Libya.  So, the natural (natural to me, anyway) question to consider are the various restrictions or caveats that sharks have:

  • Angel Sharks do not fight like to fight alongside Basking Sharks.
  • Blacktip Reef Sharks like highly restricted rules of engagement (they do fine in captivity).
  • Blacktip Sharks (distinct from the above) are more familiar with deviant behavior since they are from Florida, making them the Dutch of SharkNATO.
  • Bull Sharks are the Danes of SharkNATO, willing to go pretty much anywhere, salt water, fresh water, whatever.
  • Hammerhead Sharks appear more dangerous than they are, making them the Aussies of the Shark war (see our book for why the Aussies were the most successfully deceptive contingent).
  • Sandtiger sharks have no restrictions as they will eat their competitors in the uterus before they are born.  Try telling them to engage in courageous restraint or not to fight at night.
  • Tiger sharks have no restrictions–they will fight/eat anything anywhere anyhow.

Of course, the question we would ask, given our findings, is how many veto points is there in each shark community?

 

 

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Steve Saideman is Professor and the Paterson Chair in International Affairs at Carleton University’s Norman Paterson School of International Affairs. He has written The Ties That Divide: Ethnic Politics, Foreign Policy and International Conflict; For Kin or Country: Xenophobia, Nationalism and War (with R. William Ayres); and NATO in Afghanistan: Fighting Together, Fighting Alone (with David Auerswald), and elsewhere on nationalism, ethnic conflict, civil war, and civil-military relations.